Blog posts tagged in Aircraft Inspection

SofemaOnline (SOL) www.sofemaonline.com takes a look at the activities of the Structural Task Group (STG)

Introduction

The TCH should update periodically a list of SB which were already selected for a review with all decisions made, and add to this list all new and revised SB. Moreover, some specific modification SB not linked to an inspection SB may also be selected for review.

Operators information input should be collected and analyzed by the TCH for the STG meeting.

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Critical Task Inspection FAA versus EASA

An FAA RII item is defined as: A designation of the items of maintenance and alteration that must be inspected (required inspections) including at least those that could result in a failure, malfunction or defect, endangering the safe operation of the aircraft if not performed properly or if improper parts or materials are used.

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Important Note

In every case follow the specific task guidance from the manufactures technical documentation.

Introduction

To allow the build-up of a film of dirt can actually reduce the flying efficiency of the aircraft as well as to adds extra weight. It is also possible for dirt to obscure or hide cracks, moreover dust and grit ingress can cause excessive wear of hinge fittings.

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Posted by on in Regulatory

SofemaOnline (SOL) www.sofemaonline.com considers how we can build competence in the workplace.

SofemaOnline presents the following training, specifically developed to support the effectiveness of your Inspection Staff:

https://sofemaonline.com/lms/courses/257-aircraft-inspection-techniques-initial-with-vo/preview

This course is with voice over and is equivalent to 2 days classroom training - discounts are available for groups - please email online@sassofia.com for details.

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Considerations provided by Sofema Online - SOL (www.sofemaonline.com

General Introduction

Inspection should be carried out in accordance with an agreed time line - a single finding should not stop the process rather it should be noted & documented but the process to continue otherwise this can have significant repercussions of stopping and starting the program and finding more defects even at the end of the check.

Typically all inspection should be completed at the 20% completed point of the critical path timeline.

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Review Provided by Sofema Online (SOL)

Introduction

The Operator is responsible for the Aircraft Maintenance Program and to ensure that the relevant standards are applied.

The Inspections performed by the Part 145 Organisation must ensure adherence to the established standards as identified by the Operators AMP.

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Review carried out by Sofema Online - SOL (www.sofemaonline.com)

Introduction

On July 6, 1996, a McDonnell Douglas MD-88 equipped with Pratt & Whitney JT8D-219 turbofan engines, was on take-off roll from Runway 17 at Pensacola when it experienced an uncontained, catastrophic turbine engine failure that caused debris from the front compressor hub of the number one left engine to penetrate the left aft fuselage. The impact left two passengers dead and two severely injured; the two dead were a mother and son. The pilot aborted take-off and the airplane stopped on the runway.

The NTSB determined the most probable cause of the accident was a fracture in the left engine's front compressor fan hub, which resulted from failure of the airline's fluorescent penetrant inspection process to detect a potentially dangerous crack in the fan which originated from the engine's initial manufacture.

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What is the role of Aircraft Technical Records staff in an EASA or GCAA compliant organisation?

Technical records staff typically work either for the operator (The Continuing Airworthiness Management Organisation) CAMO or the Maintenance Organisation (145) – usually the Base Maintenance Organisation.

Considering the Typical Duties

Let’s consider the various tasks, roles and responsibilities which will apply to the Tech Records Job role:

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The Maintenance process has come a long way over the last decades – however the success of the entire process is dependent on the ability of the maintenance staff not just to perform inspections in the best way but to understand why they are performing inspections. (The criteria by which the object is being measured! It is this knowledge which makes the difference and makes you into an effective inspector.)

The Aircraft Inspector is a critical link in the Continuous Airworthiness Chain which supports the overall integrity of the aircraft. Inspections cover all areas of the aircraft including fuselage, wings, tail, landing gear and wheel well, engines, wiring and all avionic equipments. The Inspector should be trained and competent to ensure the integrity of the aircraft and to look for evidences of corrosion and metal fatigue.

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