Blog posts tagged in Airworthiness

What is the purpose of FAA Form 8130-3? 

FAA Form 8130-3 may be used:

- To constitute a statement from the FAA that a new product or article produced under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) Part 21, Certification Procedures for Products and Parts, conforms to its design and is in a condition for safe operation.

- To return to service a used product or article following inspection, maintenance, or alteration.

- When exporting products or articles to meet the requirements of bilateral agreements between the United States and other countries. This includes the shipment, not the export, of a prototype product or article to another country.

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SofemaOnline www.sofemaonline.com takes a look at the FAA Training Requirements to comply with AC 120-29A

Initial and Recurrent Maintenance Training

a. Maintenance personnel should be knowledgeable regarding the information contained in this AC and 14 CFR related to any significant aspects of LLM that may pertain to maintenance.

Operator and contract maintenance personnel including mechanics, maintenance controllers, avionics technicians, personnel performing maintenance inspection or quality assurance, or other engineering personnel if applicable, should receive initial and recurrent training as necessary for an effective program.

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Introduction

The Continuous Airworthiness Management Organization “CAMO” is essentially responsible for 4 primary functions - Planning, Technical Records, Engineering, and Reliability. These groups work together to ensure that the Aircraft remain fully compliant with all requirements concerning the aircraft maintenance management and associated oversight.

Within the CAMO the Maintenance Planning, Technical Records, Engineering & Reliability groups work together to ensure that the aircraft remain fully compliant with all requirements concerning the aircraft maintenance management and associated oversight.

Within the CAMO department the Maintenance Planning Group has a range of responsibilities including:

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Posted by on in Regulatory

Introduction

The Key to a successful delivery of “CAMO” Continuing Airworthiness is without doubt “Core Competency” across the key business elements of Continuing Airworthiness Manager (CAM), Maintenance Planning (MP), Engineering (Eng), Reliability (REL) and Tech Records (T/L).

Remember that the goal of EASA compliance is a step on the journey and not the destination – the focus of any effective Continuing Airworthiness Management Organisation (CAMO) should be to maximize the availability, reliability and safety of the fleet as well as focusing on a reduction in maintenance costs.

EASA Focus is shifting to a Performance Based Approach to Regulation

A “Performance Based Approach” brings to the fore two challenges:

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Presented by EASAonline.com.

Within the CAMO department we will see all levels of experience from Entry level administration staff through to Licensed Aircraft Engineers and Degree holding Aeronautical Engineering Staff.

Managing this department is the Continuing Airworthiness Manager (CAM), who is typically acceptable to the regulatory authority. If you are looking for a position with an organization as a CAM, you have to be highly trained and demonstrate considerable experience to achieve the position.

The Job of the Continuing Airworthiness Manager is to ensure that all Aircraft Technical Records are maintained correctly and that the aircraft is current with all maintenance requirements and is fit to fly.

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What is the role of Aircraft Technical Records staff in an EASA or GCAA compliant organisation?

Technical records staff typically work either for the operator (The Continuing Airworthiness Management Organisation) CAMO or the Maintenance Organisation (145) – usually the Base Maintenance Organisation.

Considering the Typical Duties

Let’s consider the various tasks, roles and responsibilities which will apply to the Tech Records Job role:

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What is EASA Part M?

Quite simply it is an approval which lets organisations manage the “Continuing Airworthiness” of aircraft types which the organisation is authorised to manage. (More on this later)

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) is responsible for the regulations which govern the maintenance performed on aircraft which are used for Commercial Air Transport throughout the European Community.

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Posted by on in Regulatory

Typically employed either by a standalone Continuous Airworthiness Management Organisation (CAMO) or as a member of an Operators CAMO team, the Airworthiness Review Staff has a specific responsibility to ensure the Continuing Airworthiness of the applicable aircraft are maintained.

To be approved to carry out airworthiness reviews and if applicable, to issue permits to fly, an approved CAMO shall have appropriate airworthiness review staff to issue airworthiness review certificates or to make recommendations to the regulatory authority as appropriate.

Once satisfied the Airworthiness Review Certificate - Staff (ARC) Staff will either issue a full airworthiness review or sign an extension for aircraft maintained in a controlled environment (Between Airworthiness Reviews).

Tagged in: Airworthiness ARC CAMO EASA
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SofemaOnline (www.sofemaonline.com) features European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) & Gulf Civil Aviation Authority (GCAA) selection of Technical Terms to be found in Aircraft Technical Records.

Part 1 Airworthiness Directive

An Airworthiness Directive or AD is issued when there is a problem with the aircraft which MUST be resolved. AD are issued only by the Regulatory Authority – Federal Airworthiness Authority – FAA or EASA or CAA (Civil Aviation Authority) Compliance with AD’s is mandatory!

Airworthiness Limitation Item

An Airworthiness Limitation or (ALI) is issued after the design analysis has been carried out. So they are typically available at the delivery of the very first aircraft. Compliance with ALI’s is also mandatory.

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SofemaOnline.com presents - The Role of the EASA Airworthiness Review Certificate (ARC)

Considerations to support the understanding of the role of the EASA Airworthiness Review Certificate ARC.

Applicability

Effective 29th September 2007 - All aircraft used for Commercial Air Transport have been subject to the full requirements of Part M.
ARCs are valid for 12 months. Before your ARC expires, you need to ensure that a new ARC is issued or that the current is extended in order to allow legal flight to continue.

In accordance with Part M of Regulation (EC) 1321/2014, all EASA aircraft types that qualify for an EASA Certificate of Airworthiness (CofA) are issued with a non-expiring CofA, validated annually with an Airworthiness Review Certificate (ARC).

The European Commission published amendment 1056/2008 Regulation (EC) 2042/2003 on 29 October 2008. The changes in the amendment introduce new rules and new categories of aircraft that are affected by Part M.

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