Blog posts tagged in Environment

Introduction

Whilst currently (October 2018) EASA does not mandate the obligation to ensure CAMO & Maintenance Planning Staff receive HF training, the reality is that the potential for Human Factor Error knows no bounds and it is just as likely that a Human Factor (HF) error could originate from an exposure within the Maintenance Planning Environment as anywhere else within the “Aviation System”.

Currently some 80% of aircraft accidents are attributable to human error, however this is a situation where it is possible to manage and or address by managing the exposure.

Human Error is recognised as rectifiable through the process of raising awareness, implementation of effective process and procedure and effective communication within the workplace.

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Within the workplace the consequences of human failure can be significant, unfortunately, we are all capable of error regardless of our training or motivation.

A human error is an action or decision which was not intended, however it is important to consider that human failure is not random. There are two main types of human failure: errors and violations.

Errors often occur highly trained procedures where the person carrying them out does not need to concentrate on what they are doing (Improved design can reduce their likelihood and provide a more error tolerant system).

Violations are rarely malicious (sabotage) and usually result from an intention to get the job done as efficiently as possible. Getting to the root cause of any violation is the key to understanding and hence preventing the violation.

Organisation Obligations

The potential for Human Error should be managed proactively and should be addressed as part of a wider risk assessment process.

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Whilst we all recognise the importance of safety in particular within “our” Maintenance Environment we face as an industry the problem of (Some say) Chronic under reporting of safety incidents.  Please consider when was the last time YOU filed a safety internal report?

What is the reason?

Is it the fear of reprisals or is it a case of fundamental disconnection from the responsibility to accept a personal obligation to report?

Whatever the reason the reality is that there is without doubt insufficient occurrence reporting, which results in “open” not closed loops ineffective closure and a reduced ability to deliver proactive safety improvements. (If at all !)

EASA has introduced a new EU Occurrence Reporting Regulation which is one key step in this direction as it sets a new framework to encourage and protect safety reporting by aviation professionals.

The Regulation (EU Reg. 376/2014 became applicable as of 15 Nov 2015, and requires aviation organisations in the EU to both adopt and maintain a proactive Just Culture to facilitate the collection of key safety data and information and to protect the reports as well as the information.

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We are very pleased to announce the availability of our latest training which provides for an opportunity to update regarding the Role of the Aviation Quality System within the European Aviation Safety Agency “EASA” Environment.

The Aviation Quality Compliance System should be at the heart of the operation, fully functioning and visible within every department and element of the organization.

This course delivers a comprehensive understanding of all elements of an Aviation Compliance led Quality Management System (QMS). An effective Compliance Management Process can help to support the organization in the most meaningful and tangible way. Organizations which can deliver the most effective quality audit system, together with an efficient process to follow up with all identified issues in a practical way, can excel in the delivery of their core products and services.

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