Blog posts tagged in Human Factor

Sofema Online Considers HF Exposures related to Distractions & Interruptions.

Introduction

Industry empirical data indicates that approximately 15% of maintenance related accidents are the result of distractions.

An individual having been distracted or interrupted during a task is usually unaware that an action or step may have been missed or left incomplete.

Distractions are the number one cause of forgetting to do things, however whilst distractions in the workplace cannot be eliminated we should strive to reduce them to a minimum.

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Sofema Online considers the connection between Aviation Human Factors and Safety Management within the workplace.

Human Factors awareness should be integrated throughout our safety management systems including training, supervision, procedures, workplace design, risk assessment and emergency arrangements

Introduction

Once we take the view that Humans do not deliberately make mistakes we start to understand the importance of mitigating any “perceived” exposures by understanding how humans and human behavior can most safely and efficiently be integrated within the business roles which we need to perform.

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Sofema Online considers the challenge of Managing Errors.

Introduction

To Errоr is to be Human, this is true in aviation as in any other activity, however, aviation is maybe less forgiving and we should understand the outcomes can be catastrophic.

Background

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Sofema Online (www.sofemaonline.com) considers HF exposures related to Manpower.

Introduction

Human factors issues, specifically human errors, contribute to more aircraft incidents and accidents than any other single factor. Human errors includes errors committed by maintenance personnel and others who have a direct impact on flight safety.

It is important that Organisations ensure that manpower availability is closely aligned to the specific needs. Managers and Supervisors should also be attuned to how the work environment is affecting employees to ensure harmony and balance (lack of balance can lead to fatigue & stress).

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Posted by on in Regulatory

SofemaOnline looks at language-related issues and exposure-related specifically to the Aviation Maintenance environment

Introduction

Communication effectiveness and efficiency serve as an important pillar to maintain safety and aviation professionals have a responsibility to engage with a fully understandable communication process.

Communication enables people, processes, structure, and systems, to interact simultaneously and effectively. Communication skills not only include verbal behavior and effective use of the appropriate words but include the need to ensure appropriate tone of voice, body expression, as well as other gestures.

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Sofemaonline.com offers online training including EASA Part 66 Module 9 Human Factors compliant training for third country workshop personnel

What do we mean by Team?

When we’re in the presence of others, people are more physiologically aroused and energized, and dominant behaviours are strengthened. This phenomenon is called social facilitation. 

Within the maintenance Environment we need to work together as a team to enable the accomplishment of complex tasks – however there is a difference between working as a team and working as individuals within a team.

Complex systems need ‘teams’ to get task done - Teams have to be conceived, planned and implemented with care.

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Steve Bentley MD of SAS (www.sassofia.com) discusses the various areas where the Maintenance Planning Process was able to become a precursor contributing to potential maintenance.

EASA commissioned a “Study on the need of a common worksheet/work card system” to evaluate the impact of maintenance documentation on the Human Factor concern.

(Specifications N°: EASA/2006/OP/25 On demand of the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), BUREAU VERITAS conducted a “Study on the need of a common worksheet/work card system” from January to November 2007. The present document presents the results of this study.)

The study aimed at providing further insights on the use of documentation, the common practices in place between operators and maintenance organisations and to assess whether current rules and practices may still contribute to incidents/accidents.

Among other results, the study produced a list of incidents/accidents related to the use of maintenance documentation.

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Introduction

Whilst currently (October 2018) EASA does not mandate the obligation to ensure CAMO & Maintenance Planning Staff receive HF training, the reality is that the potential for Human Factor Error knows no bounds and it is just as likely that a Human Factor (HF) error could originate from an exposure within the Maintenance Planning Environment as anywhere else within the “Aviation System”.

Currently, some 80% of aircraft accidents are attributable to human error however, this is a situation where it is possible to manage and or address by managing the exposure.

Human Error is recognised as rectifiable through the process of raising awareness, implementation of effective process and procedure and effective communication within the workplace.

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