Blog posts tagged in Part 145

Steve Bentley CEO of Sofema Aviation Services www.sassofia.com looks at common errors made by MRO’s in allocating responsibilities for process 7 procedures – compounded by the weakness of regulatory auditors to identify such. 

All comments are welcome office@sassofia.com 

145.121 Maintenance procedures and quality system

(a) The organisation shall establish a safety and quality policy for the organisation which shall be included in the organisation’s exposition.

Last modified on

How Effective is your Maintenance Error Management System (MEMS)?

The basic MEDA philosophy is based on an understanding that people do not intentionally make errors and that organizational factors play a significant and contributory role.

It is widely recognized that the majority of causal and contributory factors leading to an error can be managed. In addition developing root cause understandings, leads to a wider and more effective mitigation process.

Where do you Stand?

How many of the following questions can you answer?

Last modified on

To be approved in accordance with 14 CFR Part 145, pursuant to the terms of this Annex, the AMO shall comply with all of the following Special Conditions:

The AMO shall submit an application in a form and a manner acceptable to the FAA.

a) The application for both initial and renewed FAA certification shall include:

i. A statement demonstrating that the FAA repair station certificate and/or rating is necessary for maintaining or altering U.S.-registered aeronautical products or foreign-registered aeronautical products operated under the provisions of 14 CFR.

Tagged in: 14 CFR AMO FAA ICAO Part 145
Last modified on

Sofema Aviation Services (www.sassofia.com) considers the challenges to be found during the implementation & delivery of an effective Maintenance Error Management System (MEMS) within an EASA Part 145 Aircraft Maintenance Organisation (AMO)

Tensions between the desire to ensure safety behaviours and the organisations economic objectives (Production versus Protection) deliver real challenges which have a direct bearing on safety culture.

What is an Aviation Maintenance Safety Culture?

Tagged in: AMO EASA MEMS Part 145 Safety
Last modified on

Within the workplace the consequences of human failure can be significant, unfortunately, we are all capable of error regardless of our training or motivation.

A human error is an action or decision which was not intended, however it is important to consider that human failure is not random. There are two main types of human failure: errors and violations.

Errors often occur highly trained procedures where the person carrying them out does not need to concentrate on what they are doing (Improved design can reduce their likelihood and provide a more error tolerant system).

Violations are rarely malicious (sabotage) and usually result from an intention to get the job done as efficiently as possible. Getting to the root cause of any violation is the key to understanding and hence preventing the violation.

Organisation Obligations

The potential for Human Error should be managed proactively and should be addressed as part of a wider risk assessment process.

Last modified on

There are a number of ways we can assess the integrity of a Vendor/Supplier with the objective of improving the supplier performance.

Understanding the purpose of Receipt Discrepancy Processes and Component Reliability Assessment including warranty issues.

Why would we carry out a Vendor Survey?

Essentially it is a process which sits alongside the Supplier Evaluation Procedures and enables an ongoing assessment of the effectiveness of the supply chain arrangement with a given vendor.

What do we want to know concerning our vendors?

We want to know how effective is the product which is received from a particular supplier, and we measure this in a number of ways:

Last modified on

Certain Parts will require special attention due to the size for example Aircraft Landing Gears and Engines. To ensure adequate inspection techniques are followed the following should be included.

a) Written procedures?

b) Internal quality audit procedures?

c) Signature procedures?

d) Procedures for checking for physical damage and defects?

e) Preservation procedures?

f) Procedures for quantities received controls?

g) Verification procedures for part/model/serial numbers?

h) Documentation matches part(s)/material(s) received?

Last modified on

EASA Regulations Provide for EASA Part 145 Organisational Theoretical & Practical Training in support of Task Training for CAT A and CAT B2 Aircraft Engineers.

In Addition, EASA Regulations provide for On the Job Training (OJT) following completion of the First Type Training in each Category.

EASA Regulatory Background Guidance

66.A.45 Endorsement with aircraft ratings

In addition to the requirement of point (b), the endorsement of the first aircraft type rating within a given category/sub-category requires satisfactory completion of the corresponding On the Job Training, as described in Appendix III to Annex III (Part-66)

Last modified on

Sofema Aviation Services www.sassofia.com looks at several Organisational Challenges related to the Management of  on the Job Training within an EASA Part 145 Environment

Regulatory Background

Driven by changes in EASA regulations in accordance with EC 1149/2011 EASA introduced unique terms for Practical Training which is the responsibility of the 147 Organisation and “On the Job Training (OJT) which typically sits with the 145 organisation.

Note 2 – Whilst EASA Part 147 Contains multiple references to roles and responsibilities in respect of the role of Practical Assessor and Practical Trainer – There is an absence of guidance within EASA Part 145 - Clearly this is a challenge.

EASA References within Part 66 provide for very limited guidance material related to 145 – Ref appendices to Annex III 

Appendix III - 4.2 Point 6 On the Job Training (OJT) shall be approved by the competent authority who has issued the licence.

Last modified on

SofemaOnline provides online regulatory training courses to support the development of your Continuing Airworthiness Management Organisation (CAMO)

The following information supports consideration of which training is appropriate for a CAMO engaged with Large Aircraft (Aircraft above 5700 KGS).

All the following courses are available via the online training platform SofemaOnline.

Consider the benefits of enrolling and receiving SofemaOnline training courses:

Enjoy an Easy Online learning experience with SofemaOnline.com and SAS-e-aviation YouTube Video Channel.

Last modified on

What is Production Planning?

So lets start by saying that production planning has nothing to do with the operator (so not to confuse with the maintenance planning activities which sit within the operators remit).

Production Planning belongs to the Part 145 Production Organisation – To be effective it needs to interface with the PART M Continuing Airworthiness Management Organisation (CAMO) and ideally to be able to influence the CAMO in a positive way.

Production Planning could be considered an art in that we need to effectively bring together a number of disparate elements to obtain the best possible result in the minimum time whilst recognising the importance of Safety, Human Performance and Fatigue Risk Management Systems (FRMS).

Last modified on

Complete your repair station training with SofemaOnline.com

SofemaOnline (SOL) – Virtual Aviation Academy - The “Go To” site for online training

SOL is supported by European Aviation Institute (EAI) an EASA Part 147 approved Maintenance Training Organization (MTO) with Certificate of Approval No RO.147.0003.

Our trainings are designed to be effective and to help you reach the correct level of understanding in the comfort of your own home or office.

FAA 14 CFR Part 145 Detailed Initial Training has been developed for Quality Managers, Technicians, Mechanics, and Repairmen who are either currently involved in a repair station or intend in the future to establish a 14 CFR Part 145 repair station.

Tagged in: CFR FAA Part 145 SOL
Last modified on

Posted by on in Regulatory

GCAA says now –EASA Says Later! ICAO says 8 years ago (2009)

Sofema Aviation Services (www.sassofia.com) considers the current status of SMS within an EASA compliant Part 145 organisation.

What is SMS?

Sure we all know what is a Safety Management System (SMS)

But consider the two options :-

a) Safety Management System focused on ensuring “Mandatory Compliance” with all Safety Objectives

b) Management System focused on developing in an effective way optimized for efficiency and delivering all Mandatory Safety Objectives

Tagged in: EASA GCAA ICAO Part 145 SMS
Last modified on

Introduced by www.easaonline.com 

The requirement for EASA Compliant Fuel Tank Safety  (FTS) Training may be found in the New EASA Agency Decision Papers: •2009/006/R •2009/007/R. Both relate to Aircraft Fuel System Safety Effective from 28 March 2007. Essentially the rational for FTS Training was developed following the TWA 800 Disaster with the objective to both Familiarize candidates with the elements of Fuel Tank System Safety Issues and to enable candidates to understand the historical background and elements requiring consideration in relation to fuel system safety. In addition to Equip candidates to understand and use the language of fuel system safety issues and to allow candidates to understand and interpret fuel system safety issues from regulatory and manufacturer’s maintenance publications Satisfy Parts M & 145 Amendments on fuel system safety

Continuing Airworthiness Management and associated CAW tasks are the primary responsibility of the Operators CAMO. Regarding the management of Fuel Tank Procedures it is expected that the 145 Organisation should update the Maintenance Organisation Exposition (MOE) to include FTS concepts and organisation’s obligations. The Part 145 organisation is also responsible for all health and safety procedures including relating to fuel tank Nitrogen Inerting Systems

Last modified on

Our corporate program EASAOnline for Business (E4B) is a one-stop shop for your organisation’s EASA compliant regulatory training needs.

Fuel Tank Safety | EWIS | Production Planning | Quality Audit | Reliability | Maintenance Planning | Root Cause Analysis | Safety Management Systems | Technical Records EASA PART 145 | EASA OPS Regulation 965 | Part 21 for CAMO

EASAOnline currently has more than 1300 users enrolled in our training courses.

Last modified on

SofemaOnline.com offers a new online training covering the EASA Stores System Basic awareness.

A fully Compliant EASA Part 145 Stores and Logistics function is an extremely important business area.

A well-managed Store is an asset to the organization as it minimizes any potential loss through poor storage practices and ensures effective stock control and rotation.

EASA requires that Aircraft Stores is secure and restricted and that there is segregation between serviceable and Unserviceable Material.

Last modified on

SOL is pleased to offer a short course with exam & certificate to introduce the activities which take place within an EASA Part 145 Stores Environment.

A fully Compliant EASA Part 145 Stores and Logistics function is an extremely important business area. It is first place of entry for parts and materials entering the organization, Supply chain management is subject to regulatory oversight, it is also an essential element of the Quality System, the Stores Inspector typically reports to the Quality Manager.

A well-managed Store is an asset to the organization as it minimizes any potential loss through poor storage practices and ensures effective stock control and rotation.

Last modified on

What does EASA require for your Competence Assessment Process?

The organisation shall establish and control the competence of personnel involved in any maintenance, management and/or quality audits in accordance with a procedure and to a standard agreed by the competent authority.

In addition to the necessary expertise related to the job function, competence must include an understanding of the application of human factors and human performance issues appropriate to that person's function in the organisation.

Last modified on

How are EASA approved components released to service following component maintenance activities?

Components are released by the authorized person who signs a Form 1 to release the component as a serviceable component.

Are other checks, tests or inspections considered as a Certificate of Release to Service (CRS)?

Exactly in the same way that the various elements of a base maintenance check contribute to the overall preparation of the completed work package which enables the base maintenance check to be signed by a C certifier, A Component CRS is certified by a person who has the knowledge back ground, experience, and competence to validate that all work has been performed to prepare the component for service.

Last modified on

SofemaOnline.com (SOL) would like to welcome you to the growing numbers of satisfied users. Please visit the website to view the huge range of courses we offer.

The portfolio of available training courses is constantly being expanded and includes all the 145 recurrent training courses, ESDS, SMS, Maintenance Planning and Production Planning. As well as the generic courses which are loaded and available for all users, there are company specific courses which can only be accessed by your nominated delegate.

If any questions occur during the studying process our experienced trainers would be happy to support you.

Last modified on