Blog posts tagged in Production Planning

SofemaOnline www.sofemaonline.com looks at the Roles & Responsibilities of an Aircraft Production Support Specialist

Maintenance of aircraft fleets typically poses significant challenges with multiple, and in some ways conflicting objectives relating to the delivery of effective maintenance with the minimisation of operational costs, whilst maintaining the desired level of Safety & Service.

Production planning could be described as the ability to utilize available resources to achieve the maximum output within the available maintenance slot period.

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What is Production Planning?

So lets start by saying that production planning has nothing to do with the operator (so not to confuse with the maintenance planning activities which sit within the operators remit).

Production Planning belongs to the Part 145 Production Organisation – To be effective it needs to interface with the PART M Continuing Airworthiness Management Organisation (CAMO) and ideally to be able to influence the CAMO in a positive way.

Production Planning could be considered an art in that we need to effectively bring together a number of disparate elements to obtain the best possible result in the minimum time whilst recognising the importance of Safety, Human Performance and Fatigue Risk Management Systems (FRMS).

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What is the difference between Policy, Process and Procedures?
 
A Policy is essentially a set of basic principles and associated guidelines, formulated and enforced by the organization typically designed to demonstrate compliance with a regulatory obligation and in so doing demonstrate objectives and actions in pursuit of long-term goals.
 
A Process is typically understood to be a sequence of usually separate but linked procedures and which, also requires a number of resources to achieve.
 
Procedures provide instructions or guidance ideally in clear, non-ambiguous, and effective manner describing in “simple language” to how a particular task or activity should be accomplished.

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A service-level agreement (SLA) relates to a particular element, aspect or range of activities where a service is formally defined in a written form.

In particular the different aspects of the service or relationship - scope, quality, responsibilities - are agreed between the service provider and the service user. Service Level Agreements may be between two or more parties where one is the customer and the others are service providers.

The purpose is to support the most efficient working practices and to generate savings in the business process.
Note that - SLA’s are not normally bound by legal agreement (means contracts) such contracts between the service provider and other third parties may in fact sometimes be (incorrectly) called SLAs - Why? - Because the level of service has been set by the (principal) customer, (means it is a based not on a SLA but rather on a business requirement) - so it is an instruction!

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