Blog posts tagged in SMS

SofemaOnline takes a look at what SMS Internal Reporting Elements should be addressed in the context of the Organisational 145 SMS 

Reporting Systems should include the possibility of Voluntary and Confidential Elements, however, please note that an essential feature of a successful system is the willingness of the Employees to engage with the system. In fact, this becomes a key measure of an effective system.

Introduction

The overall purpose of the internal safety reporting scheme is to use the reported information to improve the level of the safety performance of the organisation, and not to attribute blame.

The scheme is an essential part of the overall monitoring function and should be complementary to the normal day-to-day procedures and ‘control’ systems; it is not intended to duplicate or supersede any of them.

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SofemaOnline takes a look at what SMS related Change Management Processes are coming into EASA 145 Management Systems 

Introduction

Unless they are properly managed, changes in organisational structure, facilities, the scope of work, personnel, documentation, policies, and procedures, etc. can result in the inadvertent introduction of new hazards and expose the organisation to new or increased risk.

Effective organisations seek to improve their processes, with conscious recognition that changes can expose the organisation to potentially latent hazards and risks if they are not properly and effectively managed.

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Comment by Steve Bentley CEO of www.sassofia.com 

Quality Assurance is considered as a subset of SMS. Is this correct? 

What does EASA Say? 

These key safety management processes are supported by a compliance monitoring function as an integral part of the management system for safety.

Most aviation safety regulations constitute generic safety risk controls established by the ‘regulator’. Therefore, ensuring effective compliance with the regulations during daily operations and independent monitoring of compliance are fundamental to any management system for safety.

The compliance monitoring function may, in addition, support the follow-up of safety risk mitigation actions.

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As part of the proposals to be found in forthcoming regulation NPA 2019-05 (C) SMS will be introduced into the EASA 145 Environment

Presented by SofemaOnline - a service provided by Sofema Aviation Services, offering a range of EASA, FAA and other leading regulatory compliant and vocational online courses, many with voice over.

Introduction - Safety Management Systems (SMS) - Nothing New?

SMS became an ICAO requirement as of Jan 2009 and EASA is late to embed SMS within the “145” environment. However, there is a very important aspect of SMS to consider and it is this. 

The fact that everyone is “familiar” with SMS is a source of potential challenge and even “danger”. Why? - Familiarity Breeds Contempt (Hear that one before?)

Ask your colleague to explain to you the difference between Hazard & Risk or The Difference between Compliance Auditing (Quality Assurance) and Safety Auditing, and you will see the point!

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Presented by Sofema Aviation Services (www.sassofia.com) and Sofema Online (www.sofemaonline.com)

Within the EASA Part 145 environment SMS is inextricably linked to HF working and behaviours, as well as culture and attitude within the workplace.

What does a “GOOD” Organisation look like?

Consider the following and let’s call them “Positive Organizational Characteristics”.

Tagged in: EASA Part 145 Safety SMS
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Do Organisations “underperform”?

Please consider the following questions:

Are you happy that as an Organisation you have assessed the Risk and exposure across the business to reduce it to its minimum exposure within the context of the organisations “reasonable” expectations (Here we reference the term as low as reasonably practicable ALARP)?

Are you happy with the level of reporting within the organisation? Not just the events, which have happened but also the “nearly events” how are you measuring the effectiveness of your internal reporting system?

As a general guy for every Mandatory Occurrence Report (MOR) or Service Difficulty Report (SDR).

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Presentation Introduction – The Aviation Quality & Safety Management Symposium - Holiday Inn Sofia Bulgaria – Tues May 14th & Wed May 15th 2019  

If you are engaged in Aviation Quality & Safety Management this is your one "must attend" event of the year.

Here is your opportunity to engage with a professional who has decades of experience and is able to rise to the challenge of any Airport Security issue and to share an understanding regarding best practice solutions.

For event details please see the following link:

https://sassofia.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/General_Updated_3.pdf 

Introduction

Related to SMS Quality Assurance has 2 distinct roles:

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Presentation Introduction – The Aviation Quality & Safety Management Symposium - Holiday Inn Sofia Bulgaria – Tues May 14th & Wed May 15th 2019 

Florin Necula is Accountable Manager of RAS Tech an EASA 145 based at Otopeni Airport Bucharest will be presenting on the subject of dealing with the challenges related to Developing an Aviation Safety Culture  

If you are engaged in Aviation Quality & Safety Management this is your one "must attend" event of the year.

Here is your opportunity to engage with a professional who has decades of experience and is able to rise to the challenge of any Airport Security issue and to share an understanding regarding best practice solutions.

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Date: 14-15th May 2015

Venue: Holliday Inn Hotel, Sofia, Bulgaria. 

If you are engaged in Aviation Quality & Safety Management this is your one “must attend” event of the year.

Rustom Sutaria, Director - Avia Intelligence Ltd will be running a focused workshop during the Aviation Quality & Safety Management Symposium.

De-Mystifying Bow Tie

Whilst Bowtie is one of many risk models which are able to support the identification of barriers. In many circumstances Bow Tie provides specific benefits, to assist with the identification process as well as to facilitate the management of risk.

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This Subject is presented, considered and discussed during the forthcoming Aviation Quality & Safety Management Symposium 2019 May 14 & May 15 at the Holiday Inn Sofia. 

The acceptance of the CEO, the Safety Manager and, executive team depends on a thin line between a real mistake and negligence or unacceptable conduct.

Without an effective and thriving safety culture, there will never be a fully functioning SMS.

If you are engaged in Aviation Quality & Safety Management this is your one "must attend" event of the year.

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This Subject will be presented, considered and discussed during the forthcoming Aviation Quality & Safety Management Symposium 2019 May 14 & May 15 at the Holiday Inn Sofia. 

One of the measures of a successful Safety Management System (SMS) within an organisation, is a common understanding throughout the company of what needs to be achieved to deliver the objectives and how it should be done.

Getting Behind the Objective

Provide a unified approach, one in which we all understand our individual roles, bring a common organisational system

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A Discussion Paper by Steve Bentley Group CEO of Sofema Aviation Services www.sassofia.com

Clearing up the Basic Stuff

SMS is not QMS by another name they are both separate and both significantly important QMS together with Quality Assurance (QA) strives to deliver a fully compliant product or process, whereas SMS considers the risk associated with any & all business risks. SMS is both subjective & forward looking. A fully functioning Safety Management System contributes to the viability of the organisation by addressing safety risk.

SMS should focus on real-time performance monitoring and reporting together with effective data analysis – a major challenge being to consider how to capture the required data across the business in a valid way.

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Sofema Aviation Services www.sassofia.com considers the steps necessary to deliver an effective Organisational Aviation Safety Management System (SMS)

For Any Organizational Project to be successful it must have ownership, an agreed timeline and sufficient resources to accomplish.

The Importance of Manpower Commitment

Note 1 – How does the organisation ensure there is sufficient manpower – what is the mechanism to assess – who is responsible and how does the Accountable Manager know he has this correct.

Note 2 – How does the AM ensure sufficient financial commitment to the delivery of a successful SMS – how is this represented and measured?

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Posted by on in Regulatory

Within the Aviation Safety Management System it is necessary to develop effective methods of both Top Down & Bottom up Communication.

How to measure the current status of the communication effectiveness?

Consider a Communication Audit!

A communication audit is a thorough evaluation of the organization’s ability to deliver information to every level with the organisation.

Essential the communication audit looks at both the internal mechanisms as well as the external communications for example:

a) With Contract Organizations – Data Exchange Methods!
b) With Sub Contract Service Providers (Direct Oversight)
c) Delivering information to the Front Line
d) Dealing with the challenge of the Iceberg or Ignorance

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Sofema Aviation Services www.sassofia.com considers the major challenges

Introduction

Without doubt an Effective Aviation Safety Management System (SMS) provides industry with a key driver to manage the various elements, which together can support the lowering of the exposure and lead to a reduction of incidents and accidents.

The crux of implementing an effective safety management system (SMS) is not just in defining it, but effectively implementing it throughout the business with everyone acting as a stakeholder and engaging with the organisations processes.

Tagged in: AM ICAO Safety SMS
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The Focus of this blog is to consider the inter-relationship between Maintenance Error Management Systems (MEMS) – (typically using the Boeing Maintenance Error Decision Aid as a primary tool) and Safety Management through Human Factor Learning within the context of a viable Safety Management System.

What is the Purpose of MEMS?

The rationale behind a MEMS System is to identify any situations which may “promote” the potential for error. In addition to facilitate (using the organisational framework) the risk based decision making process which will lead to stronger defences.

Tagged in: HF MEMS Safety SMS
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Driving Safety Management System (SMS) Value from your Aviation Maintenance Error Management System (MEMS).
Throughout our Industry we know that Maintenance Errors cost millions of Euros every year through the need for rework, delays and lost revenue. (To consider also the potential to introduce safety related exposures.)

What is MEDA?

Boeing developed the MEDA process to assist maintenance organisations identify why events occur and how to prevent them in the future.

MEDA provides a process for conducting thorough and consistent investigations, determining the factors that lead to an event and making improvements to reduce the likelihood of future incidents.

Tagged in: Error HF MEDA MEMS SMS
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It is not possible to separate the Safety Management System from the need to manage Ramp HF in the most effective way. In fact the more integration the better in terms of understanding and managing the exposure.

All the elements which are considered as part of our Aviation Ramp Safety & Human Factors Exposure may typically be accommodated and addressed as part of the delivery of the SMS system.

If we are able to study and take appropriate action in respect of the human factors issues, we will be able to better prepare to deal with human factors issues and behaviours in our daily routine.

Driven by ICAO obligations European Countries (as well as the rest of the world) are required to demonstrate compliance with the requirements of ICAO Annex 19.

Airports are specifically mentioned within the requirements related to the need for a State Safety Program as well as the need to demonstrate compliance with the SMS obligations.

Tagged in: HF MHF Ramp Safety SMS
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Steven Bentley MD of Sofema Aviation Services believes it is time to recognise QAS as a component of our organisations' SMS.

Where Should an EASA Compliant Quality Assurance System “Sit” in relation to the Organisations SMS?

Introduction

Historically (and growing up in the workplace through the 1970’s I can attest to the fact) there was no formal Quality Assurance within European Aviation Operations.

Of course we had Quality Control and the Role of Flight Operations Director and within Maintenance the Role of “Chief Inspector”.

As the Joint Airworthiness Authority’s influence grew the concept of an independent assessment of conformity became the acceptable way of demonstrating compliance.

Tagged in: QA QC Quality Safety SMS
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Posted by on in Regulatory

Comments by Steve Bentley MD Sofema Aviation Services www.sassofia.com

Introduction

As a precursor to the introduction of Regulation 376/2014 EASA identified shortcomings related to Aviation Occurrence Reporting and proposed in 2010 a new regulation which in compliance with ICAO objectives moved the focus from a ‘reactive’ system to a pro-active, risk and evidence based system.  It also acknowledges that safety occurrence data is vital to allow for the timely identification and management of potential safety hazards and acts upon this before these hazards turn into an actual accident. 

EASA introduced EU Regulation 376/2014, (repealing EU directive 2003/42/EC), which came into force on 15th Nov 2015. The regulation provides additional safeguards to address the lack of protection of the reporters, the lack of harmonisation in the occurrence data collection and integration (leading to low quality reports and incomplete information), as well as insufficient requirements regarding safety analysis and the resulting recommendations.

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