Blog posts tagged in Aviation Quality

All EASA Approvals typically provide an independent Quality Assurance Function (EASA Part 21J requires a design assurance system)

The next comment is to consider the EASA “take” on QA & QC (A Quality System Contains Both). QC is embedded in every aspect and element of the Production Process.

The primary objective of an EASA Compliant Quality Auditing is to ensure both external and internal compliance with regulatory and organisational procedures.

We have a number of secondary objectives which are typically organisationally driven rather than EASA driven. (Never the less such elements provide for an indication of the intent and effectiveness of the organisation.)

An example of a secondary objective would be a demonstration of continuous improvement – which would mean a reduction in findings over time for a consistent level of auditing activity.

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www.sassofia.com considers the complexities of Root Cause Analysis (RCA)

To be effective in reducing negative events we need to understand how we can use various analytical techniques to first understand and then to mitigate the actual as well as potential exposure.

The root cause analysis (RCA) method uses a cause and effect approach by asking (For example) multiple "why" questions as an effective way to identify one or more low level elements which contributed in some way to a subsequent failure.

With sufficient information available we are able to develop a number of corrective actions which should directly impact the exposure and which if taken correctly should prevent failure in the future.

Direct cause is defined as “the cause that directly resulted in the occurrence.” This would be like the person who whilst following a standard operating procedure (SOP) makes an “error” which results in an adverse outcome.

So therefore we can say that the person’s error is the direct cause of the problem that occurred.

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