Interpretation and Auditing of Aviation Standards within our EASA - Compliant Organization ANS System

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Sofema Online (SOL) www.sofemaonline.com considers the importance of ensuring effective aviation standards are identified and met throughout the organizational Air Navigation System (ANS)

Introduction Setting Standards

We use standards as a reference point or benchmark by which we can measure what we are doing to ensure it fully meets expectations

When discussing air navigation, air traffic control, and ensuring compliance with EASA (European Union Aviation Safety Agency) standards, there are several relevant standards and documents to consider. Here's a breakdown:

>> EASA Regulations: EASA has a set of regulations that cover various aspects of aviation, including air operations, aircrew, air traffic management, and air navigation services. The most relevant regulations include:

>> Regulation (EU) 2018/1139: This is the basic regulation that establishes EASA and defines its responsibilities, tasks, and powers.

>> Regulation (EU) No 373/2017: This pertains to air traffic management and air navigation services.

>> Compliance Monitoring System (CMS): To ensure that aviation organizations comply with EASA standards, they are required to establish a Compliance Monitoring System (CMS). The CMS typically includes processes for internal auditing, training, reporting, and corrective action.

 

Interpretation and Auditing of Aviation Standards:

 

>> ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization) Standards: ICAO's Annexes, particularly Annex 11 (Air Traffic Services) and Annex 6 (Operation of Aircraft), provide standards and recommended practices that are often referenced by EASA and its member states.

 

>> Auditing is a key component of the CMS. Audits are conducted to assess compliance with the applicable regulations and standards. Auditors should be trained and competent in the area they are auditing. They should use a systematic approach to gather evidence, assess compliance, and report findings.

>> EASA provides guidance material and acceptable means of compliance to help organizations interpret and apply the regulations.

Importance of Correct Interpretation:

EASA standards, like any regulatory standards, can be complex and technical. Their correct interpretation is crucial to ensure that they are applied consistently across different organizations and countries.

>> Incorrect interpretation can lead to non-compliance, which can have safety implications and lead to legal and financial consequences for the organization.

>> Different auditors might interpret certain standards differently, leading to inconsistencies in audit findings.

 

Ensuring Effective Performance:

 

>> Standards sit hand in hand with process and procedure and enable a more detailed assessment of compliance with the organization's business process objectives and expectations.

 

>> We should understand that from a practical point of view because quality standards are directly related to organizational policy, the standards need ownership.

 

>> Quality Assurance (QA) is essentially focused on the need to provide confidence that all quality requirements (QC-related) are fulfilled.

 

QA team members should have

 

>> A strong knowledge related to specific subject matter.

>> A well-developed set of interpersonal skills that promote a strong sense of diplomacy.

>> The ability to understand multiple challenges for the auditee which contribute to the “why” of the finding.

 

How to move forward with managing our standards

 

  1. Establish a strong set of procedures to ensure that all external requirements related to mandatory obligations are met.
  2. Establish a process to identify additional opportunities to develop “internal” standards but note that an essential attribute related to a particular stand must be Return on Investment (ROI) means that we should ensure that standards are working positively for the organization.
  3. Ensure that the Stakeholders in the process have the authority and capacity to support the process

 

To conclude

 

The Compliance Monitoring System (CMS) should include processes for continuous monitoring of operations and performance.

 

>> This could involve regular reviews, inspections, and checks.

>> There should be mechanisms in place for staff and other stakeholders to report concerns, non-compliances, and potential improvements.

>> When non-compliances are identified, the organization should have a process to take corrective action, which might involve retraining, process improvement, or other measures.

>> Ensuring that staff, including auditors, are adequately trained and competent is crucial. This might involve regular training, assessments, and refresher courses.

 

Importance of Correct Interpretation:

 

EASA standards, like any regulatory standards, can be complex and technical. Their correct interpretation is crucial to ensure that they are applied consistently across different organizations and countries.

 

>> Incorrect interpretation can lead to non-compliance, which can have safety implications and lead to legal and financial consequences for the organization.

>> Different auditors might interpret certain standards differently, leading to inconsistencies in audit findings.

 

Next Steps

Please see the following course  EASA Quality Assurance Auditing Introduction for Air Navigation Services (ANS) – 3 Days

Visit our websites www.sassofia.com and www.sofemaonline.com or email team@sassofia.com

 

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