Aviation Emergency Response Plan – Communication with Stakeholders

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SofemaOnline (SOL) www.sofemaonline.com considers stakeholder communication best practices.

Introduction

It should be noted that Commercial Airports worldwide are required to have an Airport Emergency Plan (AEP) in place which includes the capacity to set up and operate an Airport Crises Response function including setting up an Emergency Operations Centre.

Airlines should therefore understand that their role is to submit an airline emergency response plan (to the airport authority/operator) which integrates with (but is subordinate to) that of the airport’s equivalent plan (i.e. the AEP)

It should be noted that Commercial Airports worldwide are required to have an Airport Emergency Plan (AEP) in place which includes the capacity to set up and operate an Airport Crises Response function including setting up an Emergency Operations Centre.

Airlines should therefore understand that their role is to submit an airline emergency response plan (to the airport authority/operator) which integrates with (but is subordinate to) that of the airport’s equivalent plan (i.e. the AEP)

Who are the Interested Parties?

A Typical Emergency Event (Accident / Serious Incident) will typically involve multiple parties

  • Fire
  • Medical
  • Direct Stakeholders
  • Emergency Services (including possible military, paramilitary & search & rescue assistance)
  • Airport Authorities / Airport Management Companies / Airport Operators
  • Ground Handling Organisations, Ramp Agents etc.
  • Health Authorities - Hospitals, Ambulance - Mortuaries etc.
  • Governmental - Air accident investigation Authorities
  • Manufacturer (Type Certificate Holder – TCH) Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM)
  • Aircraft owners/lessors
  • Insurance companies/hull loss adjustors
  • Legal Representatives
  • Governmental authorities other - Humanitarian/welfare (psychosocial)
  • Support Operations - Family Assistance Plan - Victims and Family Support
  • Coroner / Medical Examiner
  • Local Government Authority
  • Volunteer – Religious Groups
  • Other Airlines / Code Share Partners
  • Embassies, consulates and similar
  • Sub-contract (external / commercial) specialist support teams

 

The above list provides guidance regarding the parties which an airline will typically be expected to engage with following a serious aircraft accident.

Ideally, a pre-planned, integrated crisis response approach between the operator and such organisations is highly beneficial but will usually be extremely difficult to achieve in practice.

Typically such a level of engagement is only available at main bases where there is sufficient engagement between the airline and airport.

Considering Typical Shortfalls

Lack of required crises support may be absent for a number of reasons

  • Lack of Competence
  • Lack of documentation crisis response plans, procedures, checklists etc
  • Inadequate finance
  • Lack of facilities (For example emergency ops centres, uninjured survivor reception centres, fire and rescue vehicles including ambulances etc.

Lack of trained and/or proficient manpower resources

Nevertheless, we still need to have the mechanism in place to cope with such unreliable and hoc and/or non-existent arrangements as far as is possible.

To access additional support documents please visit SAS download area - https://sassofia.com/download-area/#airline-ops-emergency-response-program


Next Steps

Sofema Aviation Services provides specific support related to ERP Training, Testing & Preparation of Process & Procedures – please see www.sassofia.com or email team@sassofia.com

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